Sport Related - Feed http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu news from around Wed, 26 Apr 2017 14:02:19 +0000 en-US https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.4 76135542 New museum shows migration is ‘everyone’s’ story – BBC Newshttp://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/new-museum-shows-migration-is-everyones-story-bbc-news/ Wed, 26 Apr 2017 14:02:19 +0000 http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/?p=1779
Image copyright Sir Stephen Sedley
Image caption The museum features professional and amateur photographs going back to Victorian times

From this week London gets a new Migration Museum. It's starting out in a temporary home but the hope is that within a couple of years it will move to a permanent base. The director is a former immigration judge, who says almost all of us have a migration story somewhere in our family background.

Estate agents have declared that Vauxhall, just south of the Thames, is London's emerging new cultural quarter. Artist Damien Hirst's Newport Street Gallery and the about to reopen Garden Museum are nearby. But an old London Fire Brigade (LFB) vehicle workshop is an unlikely home for a new museum designed as a contribution to one of the big debates of our century - migration.

It can't quite claim to be London's first. In Spitalfields, East London, 19 Princelet Street contains a museum of diversity which, through lack of funding, is open for only a few days each year.

Image copyright Christian Sinibaldi
Image caption Cazenove Road in Hackney, East London is "a fantastic road because it shows such diversity," says curator Sue McAlpine

For at least a year the Migration Museum is to benefit from free premises while plans are developed for the total redevelopment of the LFB site. The project's director, former judge Sophie Henderson, is leading the task of finding a permanent home.

"We discussed whether we could go outside London but eventually we decided getting the footfall and the international visitors means this is the city to be in. We'd love to find somewhere by the Thames as historically it's been such a huge part of the long story of people arriving in Britain. And it saw so many people leave to start new lives elsewhere, which is part of the story too."

Image copyright Kajal Nisha Patel/Dharmendra Patel
Image caption The images at the museum aim to show movement to and fro from the UK is a "long and magnificent" story

The museum is opening with two exhibitions as a taster of what's to come. One Hundred Images of Migration features professional and amateur photographs, which give a broad view of Britain's experience with immigration and emigration back to Victorian times. Call Me By My Name looks at the stories behind the headlines at the former migrant camp near Calais.

Henderson was a barrister specialising in immigration who went on to be an immigration judge. "We thought there was a gap in Britain's cultural landscape, which is crying out for a permanent museum like this. We're starting quite small but we want to tell the long and magnificent story of people coming to this country and leaving it over thousands of years. We want to be an important cultural space to contextualise this debate which seems on everyone's lips.

Image copyright PETER MARLOWE/MAGNUM PHOTOS
Image caption A race riot from 1977 London is featured in the opening exhibition

"By chance our opening has coincided with an election being called. But we hope to move the debate away from politics and the way the media often cover migration issues. They often have polarised positions and we need reasonable, calm debate. It's a massive issue and if you peel back the layers in almost any family in Britain you will find a migration issue somewhere. People think about it more in sound bites than they should."

The curator Sue McAlpine used to work at the Museum of London. Now she's in charge of what should go into the new museum in its start-up phase. "We don't have a permanent collection so for now we have to be very imaginative.

"The focus is visual but as we progress we'll have lots of special events for schools and colleges. There'll be discussions and podcasts and drama and oral history and even food pop-ups. Diversity will be key to making the museum an interesting place to visit.

Image copyright PETER MARLOWE/MAGNUM PHOTOS
Image caption The historically important images have led to the museum receiving funding from trusts and charitable foundations

"Our opening exhibition has images dating back to 19th Century immigration into Britain and showing London's Italian community after the war. But one of my favourite pictures is more recent. It's of Cazenove Road in Hackney which I think is a fantastic road because it shows such diversity - there are synagogues nearby and a mosque and people from the Caribbean and I think it shows how Britain mainly is a welcoming place."

Since 2013 the project has received core funding from a group of trusts and charitable foundations. Henderson says in the longer term the project hopes for sponsorship as plans emerge for a new site. Entry to the museum is free.

Once the last-minute dramas of opening are dealt with, attention will shift back to future plans. Appropriately for a museum of migration the challenge now is finding a new home. It's there they will continue to tell, in the museum's slogan, "all our stories".

The Migration Museum is open from 26 April.

Related Topics

More From this publisher : HERE

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Image copyright Sir Stephen Sedley
Image caption The museum features professional and amateur photographs going back to Victorian times

From this week London gets a new Migration Museum. It's starting out in a temporary home but the hope is that within a couple of years it will move to a permanent base. The director is a former immigration judge, who says almost all of us have a migration story somewhere in our family background.

Estate agents have declared that Vauxhall, just south of the Thames, is London's emerging new cultural quarter. Artist Damien Hirst's Newport Street Gallery and the about to reopen Garden Museum are nearby. But an old London Fire Brigade (LFB) vehicle workshop is an unlikely home for a new museum designed as a contribution to one of the big debates of our century - migration.

It can't quite claim to be London's first. In Spitalfields, East London, 19 Princelet Street contains a museum of diversity which, through lack of funding, is open for only a few days each year.

Image copyright Christian Sinibaldi
Image caption Cazenove Road in Hackney, East London is "a fantastic road because it shows such diversity," says curator Sue McAlpine

For at least a year the Migration Museum is to benefit from free premises while plans are developed for the total redevelopment of the LFB site. The project's director, former judge Sophie Henderson, is leading the task of finding a permanent home.

"We discussed whether we could go outside London but eventually we decided getting the footfall and the international visitors means this is the city to be in. We'd love to find somewhere by the Thames as historically it's been such a huge part of the long story of people arriving in Britain. And it saw so many people leave to start new lives elsewhere, which is part of the story too."

Image copyright Kajal Nisha Patel/Dharmendra Patel
Image caption The images at the museum aim to show movement to and fro from the UK is a "long and magnificent" story

The museum is opening with two exhibitions as a taster of what's to come. One Hundred Images of Migration features professional and amateur photographs, which give a broad view of Britain's experience with immigration and emigration back to Victorian times. Call Me By My Name looks at the stories behind the headlines at the former migrant camp near Calais.

Henderson was a barrister specialising in immigration who went on to be an immigration judge. "We thought there was a gap in Britain's cultural landscape, which is crying out for a permanent museum like this. We're starting quite small but we want to tell the long and magnificent story of people coming to this country and leaving it over thousands of years. We want to be an important cultural space to contextualise this debate which seems on everyone's lips.

Image copyright PETER MARLOWE/MAGNUM PHOTOS
Image caption A race riot from 1977 London is featured in the opening exhibition

"By chance our opening has coincided with an election being called. But we hope to move the debate away from politics and the way the media often cover migration issues. They often have polarised positions and we need reasonable, calm debate. It's a massive issue and if you peel back the layers in almost any family in Britain you will find a migration issue somewhere. People think about it more in sound bites than they should."

The curator Sue McAlpine used to work at the Museum of London. Now she's in charge of what should go into the new museum in its start-up phase. "We don't have a permanent collection so for now we have to be very imaginative.

"The focus is visual but as we progress we'll have lots of special events for schools and colleges. There'll be discussions and podcasts and drama and oral history and even food pop-ups. Diversity will be key to making the museum an interesting place to visit.

Image copyright PETER MARLOWE/MAGNUM PHOTOS
Image caption The historically important images have led to the museum receiving funding from trusts and charitable foundations

"Our opening exhibition has images dating back to 19th Century immigration into Britain and showing London's Italian community after the war. But one of my favourite pictures is more recent. It's of Cazenove Road in Hackney which I think is a fantastic road because it shows such diversity - there are synagogues nearby and a mosque and people from the Caribbean and I think it shows how Britain mainly is a welcoming place."

Since 2013 the project has received core funding from a group of trusts and charitable foundations. Henderson says in the longer term the project hopes for sponsorship as plans emerge for a new site. Entry to the museum is free.

Once the last-minute dramas of opening are dealt with, attention will shift back to future plans. Appropriately for a museum of migration the challenge now is finding a new home. It's there they will continue to tell, in the museum's slogan, "all our stories".

The Migration Museum is open from 26 April.

Related Topics

More From this publisher : HERE

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Group won’t host Ann Coulter, but she still plans to speak at UC Berkeleyhttp://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/group-wont-host-ann-coulter-but-she-still-plans-to-speak-at-uc-berkeley/ Wed, 26 Apr 2017 10:56:33 +0000 http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/?p=1776

(CNN)Will conservative author and commentator Ann Coulter speak Thursday on the campus of one of America's most famously progressive universities?

A student group that had been helping to plan the speaking engagement said Tuesday it now will not host the event in Berkeley, California.
But Coulter tweeted she still expects to be at the University of California's flagship campus.
    After the Washington Post and other media outlets reported that Coulter would appear at the school's famed Sproul Plaza, Coulter cautioned she knew not where or when she would speak.
    "I haven't spoken to any Berkeley students about when and where I will speak because I'm still waiting for Berkeley to tell me," she said in one tweet.
    "(Washington Post) emailed, but I can't be on email all day. Sounds like a telephone game of misinformation. Still expect Berkeley to provide a room," she said in another.
    The university wanted to reschedule Coulter's appearance until May 2, with campus police citing threats to the commentator and others connected with the event.
    CNN reached out to school officials for comment Tuesday but didn't get an immediate response.
    Chancellor Nicholas Dirks told the Post the "challenges are immense" if Coulter speaks in Sproul Plaza, where activists started the Free Speech Movement in the mid-1960s.

    Group says it won't host

    The Young America's Foundation announced it wouldn't be the host. It blamed officials at the university, saying they have created a hostile environment.
    The student group said it doesn't believe there will be proper security.
    "Young America's Foundation will not jeopardize the safety of its staff or students," the group said.
    The organization says it will continue with suing the school over its efforts reschedule Coulter's appearance.
    The lawsuit filed by the YAF and Berkeley College Republicans accuses the school of discriminating against conservative guest speakers by placing onerous time and location restrictions on their appearances.
    The lawsuit seeks to end what it calls an "unconstitutionally vague policy" that the school "selectively" applies to stifle conservative viewpoints.
    In response to the lawsuit, the school said Monday it welcomes speakers of all political viewpoints, including Coulter.
    "UC Berkeley has been working to accommodate a mutually agreeable time for Ms. Coulter's visit -- which has not yet been scheduled -- and remains committed to doing so. The campus seeks to ensure that all members of the Berkeley and larger community -- including Ms. Coulter herself -- remain safe during such an event."

    Debate over an 'unwritten' policy

    Citing safety concerns, administrators called off Coulter's Thursday appearance, saying the university needed more time to find a "suitable venue." UCPD said it had credible, specific intelligence of threats to Coulter, attendees and protesters that could lead to a repeat of violence that preempted former Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos' February appearance.
    The lawsuit accuses the school of adopting an unwritten "high-profile speaker policy" with the help of the mayor's office and Berkeley Police after the ill-fated Yiannopoulos event. The policy restricts speaking events to before 3 p.m. and says they must be held in a "securable" location, though it's not clear what that means, the lawsuit alleges.
    The lawsuit says the stipulations led the Berkeley College Republicans to cancel an event featuring conservative writer David Horowitz after the school said it would have to pay $5,788 for a security fee.
    The lawsuit demands make no specific reference to Coulter's event. In addition to unspecified punitive and compensatory damages, it asks for an injunction preventing the school from applying "any unwritten or unpublished policy restricting the exercise of political expression on the UC Berkeley campus."

    More From this publisher : HERE

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    (CNN)Will conservative author and commentator Ann Coulter speak Thursday on the campus of one of America's most famously progressive universities?

    A student group that had been helping to plan the speaking engagement said Tuesday it now will not host the event in Berkeley, California.
    But Coulter tweeted she still expects to be at the University of California's flagship campus.
      After the Washington Post and other media outlets reported that Coulter would appear at the school's famed Sproul Plaza, Coulter cautioned she knew not where or when she would speak.
      "I haven't spoken to any Berkeley students about when and where I will speak because I'm still waiting for Berkeley to tell me," she said in one tweet.
      "(Washington Post) emailed, but I can't be on email all day. Sounds like a telephone game of misinformation. Still expect Berkeley to provide a room," she said in another.
      The university wanted to reschedule Coulter's appearance until May 2, with campus police citing threats to the commentator and others connected with the event.
      CNN reached out to school officials for comment Tuesday but didn't get an immediate response.
      Chancellor Nicholas Dirks told the Post the "challenges are immense" if Coulter speaks in Sproul Plaza, where activists started the Free Speech Movement in the mid-1960s.

      Group says it won't host

      The Young America's Foundation announced it wouldn't be the host. It blamed officials at the university, saying they have created a hostile environment.
      The student group said it doesn't believe there will be proper security.
      "Young America's Foundation will not jeopardize the safety of its staff or students," the group said.
      The organization says it will continue with suing the school over its efforts reschedule Coulter's appearance.
      The lawsuit filed by the YAF and Berkeley College Republicans accuses the school of discriminating against conservative guest speakers by placing onerous time and location restrictions on their appearances.
      The lawsuit seeks to end what it calls an "unconstitutionally vague policy" that the school "selectively" applies to stifle conservative viewpoints.
      In response to the lawsuit, the school said Monday it welcomes speakers of all political viewpoints, including Coulter.
      "UC Berkeley has been working to accommodate a mutually agreeable time for Ms. Coulter's visit -- which has not yet been scheduled -- and remains committed to doing so. The campus seeks to ensure that all members of the Berkeley and larger community -- including Ms. Coulter herself -- remain safe during such an event."

      Debate over an 'unwritten' policy

      Citing safety concerns, administrators called off Coulter's Thursday appearance, saying the university needed more time to find a "suitable venue." UCPD said it had credible, specific intelligence of threats to Coulter, attendees and protesters that could lead to a repeat of violence that preempted former Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos' February appearance.
      The lawsuit accuses the school of adopting an unwritten "high-profile speaker policy" with the help of the mayor's office and Berkeley Police after the ill-fated Yiannopoulos event. The policy restricts speaking events to before 3 p.m. and says they must be held in a "securable" location, though it's not clear what that means, the lawsuit alleges.
      The lawsuit says the stipulations led the Berkeley College Republicans to cancel an event featuring conservative writer David Horowitz after the school said it would have to pay $5,788 for a security fee.
      The lawsuit demands make no specific reference to Coulter's event. In addition to unspecified punitive and compensatory damages, it asks for an injunction preventing the school from applying "any unwritten or unpublished policy restricting the exercise of political expression on the UC Berkeley campus."

      More From this publisher : HERE

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      1776
      Muslim teen boxer inspires others to never give uphttp://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/muslim-teen-boxer-inspires-others-to-never-give-up/ Wed, 26 Apr 2017 07:54:23 +0000 http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/?p=1773

      (CNN)For this teen passionate about boxing, her fight to go toe-to-toe with an opponent goes far beyond the ring. She's fighting for the right to compete in her hijab.

      Amaiya Zafar, 16, started boxing three years ago and is already making waves in the boxing community. Not only is the Minnesota teen competing in a male-dominated sport, but she's also a devout Muslim.
      "When I walked into a real boxing gym for the first time, I knew this was it for the rest of my life," she said.
        In the ring, Zafar wears a hijab, long sleeves and leggings under her uniform. She was disqualified at a bout in November for wearing her hijab; it violated USA Boxing uniform regulations.
        "Why should I have to compromise the sport that I love? This is my life." Zafar told CNN affiliate WCCO. "I go to the gym every single day, why should I have to compromise that for my religion?"
        She continued to train several days a week and study matches, just waiting for the chance to compete in the ring.
        Zafar, her family, gym (Circle of Discipline) and The Council on American-Islamic Relations, or CAIR, have been petitioning the USA Boxing Association to add a religious exemption to its policies.
        "You know, the battle is not given to the swift but to he who can endure it to the end," Zafar said. "At the end of the day, if I never get to compete but get the rule changed so other Muslim girls in the US can compete, then I have won."
        The amateur boxer just won a victory last week that will allow her to compete in her religious attire. The USA Boxing Association granted Zafar a wavier to compete at local matches.
        "USA Boxing is excited that our youth boxing programs attract stellar athletes from diverse walks of life, and we are in the process of amending our domestic competition rules specifically to accommodate the clothing and grooming mandates of our boxers' religions," USA Boxing spokesperson Mike McAtee said in a statement to CNN.
        "These rules will provide exemptions so that athletes can box without running afoul of their beliefs."
        Years in the making, this weekend will be Zafar's first official match where she is allowed to wear her hijab. And she's also making boxing history.
        She will be the first boxer allowed to fight in a USA Boxing-sanctioned event while wearing hijab, according to CAIR.
        "It starts with one person and it doesn't matter how small you are. It takes one person to spark change," she said.
        Zafar has her eyes set on the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. She has already started petitioning the International Boxing Association to have a religious exemption added to the rulebook.

        More From this publisher : HERE

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        (CNN)For this teen passionate about boxing, her fight to go toe-to-toe with an opponent goes far beyond the ring. She's fighting for the right to compete in her hijab.

        Amaiya Zafar, 16, started boxing three years ago and is already making waves in the boxing community. Not only is the Minnesota teen competing in a male-dominated sport, but she's also a devout Muslim.
        "When I walked into a real boxing gym for the first time, I knew this was it for the rest of my life," she said.
          In the ring, Zafar wears a hijab, long sleeves and leggings under her uniform. She was disqualified at a bout in November for wearing her hijab; it violated USA Boxing uniform regulations.
          "Why should I have to compromise the sport that I love? This is my life." Zafar told CNN affiliate WCCO. "I go to the gym every single day, why should I have to compromise that for my religion?"
          She continued to train several days a week and study matches, just waiting for the chance to compete in the ring.
          Zafar, her family, gym (Circle of Discipline) and The Council on American-Islamic Relations, or CAIR, have been petitioning the USA Boxing Association to add a religious exemption to its policies.
          "You know, the battle is not given to the swift but to he who can endure it to the end," Zafar said. "At the end of the day, if I never get to compete but get the rule changed so other Muslim girls in the US can compete, then I have won."
          The amateur boxer just won a victory last week that will allow her to compete in her religious attire. The USA Boxing Association granted Zafar a wavier to compete at local matches.
          "USA Boxing is excited that our youth boxing programs attract stellar athletes from diverse walks of life, and we are in the process of amending our domestic competition rules specifically to accommodate the clothing and grooming mandates of our boxers' religions," USA Boxing spokesperson Mike McAtee said in a statement to CNN.
          "These rules will provide exemptions so that athletes can box without running afoul of their beliefs."
          Years in the making, this weekend will be Zafar's first official match where she is allowed to wear her hijab. And she's also making boxing history.
          She will be the first boxer allowed to fight in a USA Boxing-sanctioned event while wearing hijab, according to CAIR.
          "It starts with one person and it doesn't matter how small you are. It takes one person to spark change," she said.
          Zafar has her eyes set on the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. She has already started petitioning the International Boxing Association to have a religious exemption added to the rulebook.

          More From this publisher : HERE

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          1773
          Snapchat wants to open millennials’ eyes to life in Baghdadhttp://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/snapchat-wants-to-open-millennials-eyes-to-life-in-baghdad/ Wed, 26 Apr 2017 01:14:23 +0000 http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/?p=1770

          Image: bloomberg via getty images 

          Snapchat has curated snaps about life in Baghdad to create an Our Story to go live Monday afternoon.

          That's Snapchat-jargon for the mobile storytelling app opening up a geofence around Baghdad and encouraging Snapchat users to submit photos and videos to Snap (with Baghdad geofilters live in the app). Snapchat will later curate and stitch those submissions into one story exclusively available on the app.

          The feed should go live on the app at about 3 p.m. ET Monday.

          Snapchat does not plan to include much about the violence or anything too politically-related to what's happening in Baghdad. Rather, the app is looking for snaps that show residents simply living their lives.

          The feed won't just be in English. Snapchat will run an Arabic version in Arabic-speaking countries and will run a version with English subtitles shown in English-speaking countries.

          The app might mostly be associated with millennials sending goofy or intimate photos to each other, but Snapchat has championed itself as an original and thoughtful entrant into news coverage as well as storytelling. The app featured life in Mecca back in July 2015 and provided a raw look at the reactions of young Americans to the election.

          While these stories spark interest and engagement from users, they don't come without their controversies. After Snapchat created a Live Story for the Israeli city of Tel Aviv, Twitter users asked Snapchat why it showed only one side of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Snapchat, two days later, created a Live Story for West Bank.

          Over the last two years, Snapchat has matured its news product. The company hired Peter Hamby back in April 2015 to serve as Snapchat's first head of news. The former CNN national political reporter now helps lead a team dedicated to creating Our Stories. For example, Snapchat built a story around the Battle of Mosul. Hamby also launched his own political news show on Snapchat called Good Luck America.

          This isn't the first time Snapchat has built an Our Story for multiple languages. An Our Story on the London terror attack was curated in English and French, and they curated a story in English and Arabic for Dubai Fashion Week.

          As Facebook continues to mimic Snapchat's Stories product, with Facebook Stories, Instagram Stories, WhatsApp Stories and Messenger Day, Snapchat stands uniquely positioned in its dedication in and ability to curate and tell stories.

          FWIW, Instagram does have an Explore tab that has curated for live events.

          WATCH: Stephen Colbert and 'SNL' have figured out the right way to use President Trump

          More From this publisher : HERE

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          Image: bloomberg via getty images 

          Snapchat has curated snaps about life in Baghdad to create an Our Story to go live Monday afternoon.

          That's Snapchat-jargon for the mobile storytelling app opening up a geofence around Baghdad and encouraging Snapchat users to submit photos and videos to Snap (with Baghdad geofilters live in the app). Snapchat will later curate and stitch those submissions into one story exclusively available on the app.

          The feed should go live on the app at about 3 p.m. ET Monday.

          Snapchat does not plan to include much about the violence or anything too politically-related to what's happening in Baghdad. Rather, the app is looking for snaps that show residents simply living their lives.

          The feed won't just be in English. Snapchat will run an Arabic version in Arabic-speaking countries and will run a version with English subtitles shown in English-speaking countries.

          The app might mostly be associated with millennials sending goofy or intimate photos to each other, but Snapchat has championed itself as an original and thoughtful entrant into news coverage as well as storytelling. The app featured life in Mecca back in July 2015 and provided a raw look at the reactions of young Americans to the election.

          While these stories spark interest and engagement from users, they don't come without their controversies. After Snapchat created a Live Story for the Israeli city of Tel Aviv, Twitter users asked Snapchat why it showed only one side of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Snapchat, two days later, created a Live Story for West Bank.

          Over the last two years, Snapchat has matured its news product. The company hired Peter Hamby back in April 2015 to serve as Snapchat's first head of news. The former CNN national political reporter now helps lead a team dedicated to creating Our Stories. For example, Snapchat built a story around the Battle of Mosul. Hamby also launched his own political news show on Snapchat called Good Luck America.

          This isn't the first time Snapchat has built an Our Story for multiple languages. An Our Story on the London terror attack was curated in English and French, and they curated a story in English and Arabic for Dubai Fashion Week.

          As Facebook continues to mimic Snapchat's Stories product, with Facebook Stories, Instagram Stories, WhatsApp Stories and Messenger Day, Snapchat stands uniquely positioned in its dedication in and ability to curate and tell stories.

          FWIW, Instagram does have an Explore tab that has curated for live events.

          WATCH: Stephen Colbert and 'SNL' have figured out the right way to use President Trump

          More From this publisher : HERE

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          1770
          Facebook and GIPHY are now good friendshttp://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/facebook-and-giphy-are-now-good-friends/ Tue, 25 Apr 2017 22:17:50 +0000 http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/?p=1767
          Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote address at Facebook's F8 Developer Conference on April 18, 2017 at McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California.
          Image: justin sullivan/Getty Images

          Once upon a time, Facebook did not support GIFs. In fact, there was a time when Facebook supported the file format and then took that support away.

          Developers tried to hack it. One group succeeded, in a way. GIPHY, one of the internet's most successful GIF-based plaftorms, built and launched a feature that let Facebook users share moving images on the site.

          They weren't GIFs, Mashable's Lance Ulanoff reported back in 2013. As in they were not in the native GIF format, and yet, they were moving images in Facebook posts and comments, which people mistakenly referred to as GIFs.

          "You're right this is not native GIF format support but it is the first time you've been able to find a GIF on the Internet and then get it to play on Facebook," GIPHY founder and CEO Alex Chung wrote to Lance in an email. "We think that's really awesome. We hope Facebook will support the .gif native format someday and we are lobbying them to do so but that is up to them."

          Back in 2013, Facebook did not provide a timeline for the future of GIFs on Facebook.com.

          GIPHY waited.

          Image: giphy

          Now, GIPHY and Facebook seem like the best of friends.

          Last week, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his team presented the future of Facebook at F8, Facebook's annual developer conference. Their grand plan to takeover connect the world included social VR, internet-beaming drones, and typing with your brain, as well as sharing and creating more GIFs with the help of GIPHY.

          During the keynote presentation, GIPHY was mentioned and displayed repeatedly:

          GIPHY and Facebook, together, released three new products this week:

          GIPHY Thoughts, for Facebook Camera an animated thought bubble appears above the person's head and includes a random GIF of "what they're thinking":

          GIPHY Live, for Facebook Live have animated lenses and gifs appear in a live streaming video on Facebook

          GIPHY is also available in Messenger.

          GIPHY pitched and was approved by Facebook for three different integrations within the Facebook ecosystem.

          We caught up with four of GIPHY's team members during the second day of F8, where the team shared their love of GIFs whether it's the technical format or a general moving picture and explained how their relationship with Facebook has grown.

          It began with Facebook welcoming GIFs back to the website in 2015.

          What's probably most fascinating is GIPHY's dedication to this launch. The team, based out of New York, spent the last month building the product. It wasn't easy because each of the products were conceived and coded exclusively for Facebook.

          No money changed hands, according to GIPHY. In fact, the company has yet to prioritize revenue. They don't have to, yet, Julie Logan, director of brand strategy, told me. The company is still focused on growing which means getting people to share as many GIFs as possible. That includes creating GIFs and optimizing its API for other companies to use along with building these exclusive relationships.

          While they weren't paid by Facebook, the builds were worth it, according to GIPHY.

          Image: giphy

          They now have access to nearly 2 billion people via Facebook.

          WATCH: Lady Gaga FaceTimed with Prince William to discuss a very important issue

          More From this publisher : HERE

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          Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote address at Facebook's F8 Developer Conference on April 18, 2017 at McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California.
          Image: justin sullivan/Getty Images

          Once upon a time, Facebook did not support GIFs. In fact, there was a time when Facebook supported the file format and then took that support away.

          Developers tried to hack it. One group succeeded, in a way. GIPHY, one of the internet's most successful GIF-based plaftorms, built and launched a feature that let Facebook users share moving images on the site.

          They weren't GIFs, Mashable's Lance Ulanoff reported back in 2013. As in they were not in the native GIF format, and yet, they were moving images in Facebook posts and comments, which people mistakenly referred to as GIFs.

          "You're right this is not native GIF format support but it is the first time you've been able to find a GIF on the Internet and then get it to play on Facebook," GIPHY founder and CEO Alex Chung wrote to Lance in an email. "We think that's really awesome. We hope Facebook will support the .gif native format someday and we are lobbying them to do so but that is up to them."

          Back in 2013, Facebook did not provide a timeline for the future of GIFs on Facebook.com.

          GIPHY waited.

          Image: giphy

          Now, GIPHY and Facebook seem like the best of friends.

          Last week, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his team presented the future of Facebook at F8, Facebook's annual developer conference. Their grand plan to takeover connect the world included social VR, internet-beaming drones, and typing with your brain, as well as sharing and creating more GIFs with the help of GIPHY.

          During the keynote presentation, GIPHY was mentioned and displayed repeatedly:

          GIPHY and Facebook, together, released three new products this week:

          GIPHY Thoughts, for Facebook Camera an animated thought bubble appears above the person's head and includes a random GIF of "what they're thinking":

          GIPHY Live, for Facebook Live have animated lenses and gifs appear in a live streaming video on Facebook

          GIPHY is also available in Messenger.

          GIPHY pitched and was approved by Facebook for three different integrations within the Facebook ecosystem.

          We caught up with four of GIPHY's team members during the second day of F8, where the team shared their love of GIFs whether it's the technical format or a general moving picture and explained how their relationship with Facebook has grown.

          It began with Facebook welcoming GIFs back to the website in 2015.

          What's probably most fascinating is GIPHY's dedication to this launch. The team, based out of New York, spent the last month building the product. It wasn't easy because each of the products were conceived and coded exclusively for Facebook.

          No money changed hands, according to GIPHY. In fact, the company has yet to prioritize revenue. They don't have to, yet, Julie Logan, director of brand strategy, told me. The company is still focused on growing which means getting people to share as many GIFs as possible. That includes creating GIFs and optimizing its API for other companies to use along with building these exclusive relationships.

          While they weren't paid by Facebook, the builds were worth it, according to GIPHY.

          Image: giphy

          They now have access to nearly 2 billion people via Facebook.

          WATCH: Lady Gaga FaceTimed with Prince William to discuss a very important issue

          More From this publisher : HERE

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