Sport Related - Feed http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu news from around Sun, 28 May 2017 23:27:22 +0000 en-US https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 76135542 Apple launches its first store in Southeast Asiahttp://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/apple-launches-its-first-store-in-southeast-asia/ Sun, 28 May 2017 23:24:29 +0000 http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/?p=2465

Image: Ng Yi Shu/MAshable

Khajorn Chiaranaipanich flew for more than two hours to be one of the first people to experience Apple's first store in Singapore.

Witnessing its opening was very important for the managing director at a Thai social news company so important, that he had been waiting in the queue at 5 a.m, five whole hours before the store officially opened.

Located at the heart of Orchard Road, the city's retail centre, Apple's opened its first Southeast Asian location and added its ninth high-profile Apple Store globally, amidst others in Ginza, Dubai, Soho, and New York.

"It's the first Apple store in Southeast Asia, so it's very important for Thai people," Khajorn told Mashable. "If they build an Apple Store here, it means that they're building something for us in Southeast Asia. The next market could be Thailand or Indonesia or something like that."

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

A long line of people were already queueing up outside Knightsbridge Mall, before the store opened at 10 a.m. Singapore time.

Some were there since 5 p.m. the previous day. And like Khajorn, many flew in from places like China to witness the store's opening.

"We were going to start school [in Singapore], and when we heard that the Apple Store was opening, we wanted to be here," said Yang Chen, a 28-year-old graduate student from Xiamen, who was at the Apple Store from 8 p.m. the previous day.

Grey shirts with the Apple logo, a heart shape and a red dot symbolizing Singapore were given out to the first few customers.

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

"We've been waiting for this store for so long... being at an Apple Store is a different experience. It's not like going to an Apple authorized sale centre. It's very lovely to be here, it's like a shrine for Apple fans," said Reyazuddin Shaik, a 40-year-old Singaporean, had been queuing up since 8 a.m.

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Apple's launching the store in a region where Apple has faced immense competition with much cheaper Android alternatives, like Xiaomi, Oppo and Samsung.

It's also faced difficulties with trade regulations in Indonesia, that prevented the tech giant from launching the iPhone 6S in the country.

The Silicon Valley tech giant was only able to launch the iPhone 7 in neighboring Indonesia in April this year after acceding to Indonesian regulations.

A customer poses for a photo with Angela Ahrendts, senior VP of retail at Apple

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Ahrendts was surrounded by Apple fans at the store's opening

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

While Singapore is a small market for Apple the island has the highest smartphone penetration in the world there's still a burgeoning market for Apple in surrounding countries, where smartphone penetration is not as high.

Demand for high-end devices have increased in the region, according to research from IDC, a marketing intelligence firm. In 2015, more than 100 million smartphones were sold in the region, which has a population of more than 600 million people. The number is expected to grow even more in the years to come, as an estimated 3.8 million people come online in the region each month.

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

An iPhone on display in the Apple Store

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Besides being home to Apple's products, the store also features the tech giant's Today at Apple program, with workshops, events and in-store classes occurring with local talent. Apple envisions the store as "modern-day town square," and expects it to be one of its most popular.

The program in Singapore's Apple Store will focus on photography, film, coding, music, art, and design.

More From this publisher : HERE

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Learn More Here: Apple launches its first store in Southeast Asia
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Image: Ng Yi Shu/MAshable

Khajorn Chiaranaipanich flew for more than two hours to be one of the first people to experience Apple's first store in Singapore.

Witnessing its opening was very important for the managing director at a Thai social news company so important, that he had been waiting in the queue at 5 a.m, five whole hours before the store officially opened.

Located at the heart of Orchard Road, the city's retail centre, Apple's opened its first Southeast Asian location and added its ninth high-profile Apple Store globally, amidst others in Ginza, Dubai, Soho, and New York.

"It's the first Apple store in Southeast Asia, so it's very important for Thai people," Khajorn told Mashable. "If they build an Apple Store here, it means that they're building something for us in Southeast Asia. The next market could be Thailand or Indonesia or something like that."

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

A long line of people were already queueing up outside Knightsbridge Mall, before the store opened at 10 a.m. Singapore time.

Some were there since 5 p.m. the previous day. And like Khajorn, many flew in from places like China to witness the store's opening.

"We were going to start school [in Singapore], and when we heard that the Apple Store was opening, we wanted to be here," said Yang Chen, a 28-year-old graduate student from Xiamen, who was at the Apple Store from 8 p.m. the previous day.

Grey shirts with the Apple logo, a heart shape and a red dot symbolizing Singapore were given out to the first few customers.

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

"We've been waiting for this store for so long... being at an Apple Store is a different experience. It's not like going to an Apple authorized sale centre. It's very lovely to be here, it's like a shrine for Apple fans," said Reyazuddin Shaik, a 40-year-old Singaporean, had been queuing up since 8 a.m.

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Apple's launching the store in a region where Apple has faced immense competition with much cheaper Android alternatives, like Xiaomi, Oppo and Samsung.

It's also faced difficulties with trade regulations in Indonesia, that prevented the tech giant from launching the iPhone 6S in the country.

The Silicon Valley tech giant was only able to launch the iPhone 7 in neighboring Indonesia in April this year after acceding to Indonesian regulations.

A customer poses for a photo with Angela Ahrendts, senior VP of retail at Apple

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Ahrendts was surrounded by Apple fans at the store's opening

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

While Singapore is a small market for Apple the island has the highest smartphone penetration in the world there's still a burgeoning market for Apple in surrounding countries, where smartphone penetration is not as high.

Demand for high-end devices have increased in the region, according to research from IDC, a marketing intelligence firm. In 2015, more than 100 million smartphones were sold in the region, which has a population of more than 600 million people. The number is expected to grow even more in the years to come, as an estimated 3.8 million people come online in the region each month.

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

An iPhone on display in the Apple Store

Image: ng yi shu/mashable

Besides being home to Apple's products, the store also features the tech giant's Today at Apple program, with workshops, events and in-store classes occurring with local talent. Apple envisions the store as "modern-day town square," and expects it to be one of its most popular.

The program in Singapore's Apple Store will focus on photography, film, coding, music, art, and design.

More From this publisher : HERE

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Learn More Here: Apple launches its first store in Southeast Asia
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2465
These new 3D scan fit helmets could make football saferhttp://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/these-new-3d-scan-fit-helmets-could-make-football-safer/ Sun, 28 May 2017 20:24:56 +0000 http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/?p=2462
Riddell's next step in football helmet technology includes personalized 3D head scans.
Image: lili sams/Mashable

Helmets already make the violent game of football safer, but one of the biggest equipment makers in the sport is making them even better. It's developed a new process to create helmets that could play a role in preventing the traumatic head injuries that currently plague the game and threaten its future.

Riddell, the company behind the helmets worn by around 60 percent of NFL players, will use a new 3D head-scanning process on each player who wears its new Precision Fit headgear. To be sure there are other innovations in helmet tech, but unlike just about every other helmet design on the market, which use inflatable pads that are adjusted manually by handheld air pumps, the inside of the Precision Fit models have a custom-fit liner system made of "energy managing materials" built according to the personalized scan data of each player's head.

The personalization is meant to make players more comfortable and therefore, safer than ever before according to its makers, who call it "the perfect fitting helmet." While the custom fit will certainly help to prevent injuries that stem from poorly-adjusted headgear, and perform better than helmets mass produced for the general market, it's important to note that there's no current tech that can protect against every single injury. Football is filled with collisions that have been measured on the same scale as car crashes, so as long as the sport is played as it is today, head injuries will be an unfortunate, unavoidable reality.

After four years of development and a successful limited run of beta testing at select colleges, Precision Fit will be available to NFL players for the the 2017 season.

The Riddell team stopped by Mashable HQ so I could check out the scanning process for myself. I played the sport through high school, college, and professionally in Germany, so I've worn football helmets for my entire life including the Riddell Speed model the Precision Fit system is built on but I've never experienced anything like this.

A standard model of the Speedflex helmet.

Image: riddell

When I played youth football, helmets were given out to players without much thought, with a few pumps of air and a hearty slap on the side of the head to check if it stayed in place. Later in my career, as the extent of the danger that comes with head injuries and concussions came to light, I was specially fitted for each helmet I wore but managing that fit throughout the season was largely left to me.

The status of my helmet was always a major concern for me, but it quickly took a backseat to my focus on the field during games. I often found myself playing with a less-than-ideal fit, which might have contributed to my own experiences with concussions. Football players today need to be able to play without those issues with comfort and function which is why Riddell's new fitting process caught my attention.

Scanning for a perfect fit

I was given a cowl to put on under a demo helmet, which I then strapped on tightly so the scanner could record exactly where it sat on my head.

I got the helmet set comfortably on my head, as if I were putting it on for a game.

Image: lili sams/mashable

The Riddell tech walked around me in a circle to capture a 360-degree scan of my head with the helmet on, using a 3D scanner hooked up to a Surface tablet running the company's proprietary software.

The scanner captured images of exactly how the helmet sat on my head.

Image: lili sams/mashable

After recording the helmet, a second scan was taken with only the cowl to capture the exact shape of my head for the mold.

After capturing my head in the helmet, a second scan was taken with the lining cap.

Image: lili sams/mashable

My Precision Fit scan experience, which took about five minutes, was only a demo. Riddell won't be making me a helmet of my own, due to cost and time constraints; players typically get their helmets four to six weeks after the scan.

But a scan is just the start for the players who will depend on the helmets on the field this upcoming season. First, Riddell engineers import each players' scan data into CAD design software to recreate the exact surface and head placement for production. Using the scan data, the eight-pad custom linings are then machined (cut) from the energy-managing material, which Thad Ide, Riddell's Senior Vice President of Research and Product Development, told me is a composite polyurethane, engineered to possess "multiple densities tuned to perform the way we want it to perform."

The liner feels more solid than the air pockets in helmets I wore back in the day, and it's designed to "grow" to match the surface of its wearers head, kind of like an extra protective layer of memory foam.

The Precision Fit helmet lining.

Image: lili sams/mashable

Ide didn't share exactly how much a Precision Fit helmet will cost for each individual player because it's a prototype, but one of Riddell's standard Speedflex units costs $409.99, so a custom fit would presumably be even more expensive. Instead, Riddell will offer the custom helmets as an option for teams to buy in bulk, which Ide said is standard practice already across all levels of football. He doesn't think cost will be a problem for smaller programs in the future.

"Scaleability and affordability are important to us on this platform," he said. "Were rolling it out for large colleges and professional teams, but as we scale it I can see this becoming an affordable option for high schools, junior highs, youth programs these are all things were working on."

The Precision Fit helmets are made to last for a player's entire career, too, which could help with affordability. The headgear would be reconditioned and re-certified every year by Riddell which is standard protocol for all football helmets at every level of play already, as Ide said it would be "atypical" for even a high school program to not recondition its helmets every year so the helmets will conceivably perform just as well after a few seasons as it did new.

Smarter innovation

Precision Fit is just a step in Riddell's plan to bring the football helmet in line with modern technology. Ide said the company has two distinct development paths: one focused on harnessing sensors and computing to capture impact data for future development, another for the more immediately pressing matter of a helmet maker, head protection.

"Riddell invested more than 10 years ago in head impact monitoring and helmet-based sensor technology that can transmit impact data from the field to the sideline," he said. "Weve collected about five million impacts, and we have enough of a database now that you can really see differences in impact profiles. We think were at the point where we can tune helmets to be optimized for playing position, skill level, because players see different types of impact profiles depending on those factors."

Ide said integrated sensor tech and position-specific helmets will be expected in helmets in as little as five years, and individual "impact profiles" tracking their on-field collisions will give players, coaches, and medical staffs better insight into each individual's playing style and how best to protect their heads.

The company has a plan to bring its sensors and head protection together by 2022.

Image: riddell

Riddell is far from the only company working to improve football helmet design its biggest rival, Schutt (which claims 37 percent of the NFL market), released two new models last year, the Vengeance Z10 and the Vengeance Pro, which tout new lightweight builds with high safety ratings. The two companies are currently locked in a legal battle over patent infringement but a new player is primed to enter the scene.

Starting this year, NFL and college players will be allowed to wear headgear made by Vicis, a Seattle-based startup whose Zero1 helmet is designed to yield to contact and "deform" at the point of impact, unlike Schutt and Riddell's designs, which have rigid outer shells and pads to cushion the head after each collision. The Zero1 was the highest-performing helmet in an NFL-sponsored safety test, so it will likely be adopted by players looking for increased protection.

In this field, competition and new innovations should be more than welcome by the helmet makers and everyone else involved in the effort to make the game safer. For now, though, increased levels of protection is all these helmet makers can offer players and teams.

Concussions, which most typically occur in football when a high level impact causes the brain to strike the skull and begins to swell, can't just be prevented by a better fitting helmet. They're an unavoidable reality for the sport as it's currently played, and no helmet can promise a truly concussion-free football experience so bringing new safety technologies onto the field will be integral to football's future.

More From this publisher : HERE

=>
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Article Source Here: These new 3D scan fit helmets could make football safer
************************************
=>

]]>
Riddell's next step in football helmet technology includes personalized 3D head scans.
Image: lili sams/Mashable

Helmets already make the violent game of football safer, but one of the biggest equipment makers in the sport is making them even better. It's developed a new process to create helmets that could play a role in preventing the traumatic head injuries that currently plague the game and threaten its future.

Riddell, the company behind the helmets worn by around 60 percent of NFL players, will use a new 3D head-scanning process on each player who wears its new Precision Fit headgear. To be sure there are other innovations in helmet tech, but unlike just about every other helmet design on the market, which use inflatable pads that are adjusted manually by handheld air pumps, the inside of the Precision Fit models have a custom-fit liner system made of "energy managing materials" built according to the personalized scan data of each player's head.

The personalization is meant to make players more comfortable and therefore, safer than ever before according to its makers, who call it "the perfect fitting helmet." While the custom fit will certainly help to prevent injuries that stem from poorly-adjusted headgear, and perform better than helmets mass produced for the general market, it's important to note that there's no current tech that can protect against every single injury. Football is filled with collisions that have been measured on the same scale as car crashes, so as long as the sport is played as it is today, head injuries will be an unfortunate, unavoidable reality.

After four years of development and a successful limited run of beta testing at select colleges, Precision Fit will be available to NFL players for the the 2017 season.

The Riddell team stopped by Mashable HQ so I could check out the scanning process for myself. I played the sport through high school, college, and professionally in Germany, so I've worn football helmets for my entire life including the Riddell Speed model the Precision Fit system is built on but I've never experienced anything like this.

A standard model of the Speedflex helmet.

Image: riddell

When I played youth football, helmets were given out to players without much thought, with a few pumps of air and a hearty slap on the side of the head to check if it stayed in place. Later in my career, as the extent of the danger that comes with head injuries and concussions came to light, I was specially fitted for each helmet I wore but managing that fit throughout the season was largely left to me.

The status of my helmet was always a major concern for me, but it quickly took a backseat to my focus on the field during games. I often found myself playing with a less-than-ideal fit, which might have contributed to my own experiences with concussions. Football players today need to be able to play without those issues with comfort and function which is why Riddell's new fitting process caught my attention.

Scanning for a perfect fit

I was given a cowl to put on under a demo helmet, which I then strapped on tightly so the scanner could record exactly where it sat on my head.

I got the helmet set comfortably on my head, as if I were putting it on for a game.

Image: lili sams/mashable

The Riddell tech walked around me in a circle to capture a 360-degree scan of my head with the helmet on, using a 3D scanner hooked up to a Surface tablet running the company's proprietary software.

The scanner captured images of exactly how the helmet sat on my head.

Image: lili sams/mashable

After recording the helmet, a second scan was taken with only the cowl to capture the exact shape of my head for the mold.

After capturing my head in the helmet, a second scan was taken with the lining cap.

Image: lili sams/mashable

My Precision Fit scan experience, which took about five minutes, was only a demo. Riddell won't be making me a helmet of my own, due to cost and time constraints; players typically get their helmets four to six weeks after the scan.

But a scan is just the start for the players who will depend on the helmets on the field this upcoming season. First, Riddell engineers import each players' scan data into CAD design software to recreate the exact surface and head placement for production. Using the scan data, the eight-pad custom linings are then machined (cut) from the energy-managing material, which Thad Ide, Riddell's Senior Vice President of Research and Product Development, told me is a composite polyurethane, engineered to possess "multiple densities tuned to perform the way we want it to perform."

The liner feels more solid than the air pockets in helmets I wore back in the day, and it's designed to "grow" to match the surface of its wearers head, kind of like an extra protective layer of memory foam.

The Precision Fit helmet lining.

Image: lili sams/mashable

Ide didn't share exactly how much a Precision Fit helmet will cost for each individual player because it's a prototype, but one of Riddell's standard Speedflex units costs $409.99, so a custom fit would presumably be even more expensive. Instead, Riddell will offer the custom helmets as an option for teams to buy in bulk, which Ide said is standard practice already across all levels of football. He doesn't think cost will be a problem for smaller programs in the future.

"Scaleability and affordability are important to us on this platform," he said. "Were rolling it out for large colleges and professional teams, but as we scale it I can see this becoming an affordable option for high schools, junior highs, youth programs these are all things were working on."

The Precision Fit helmets are made to last for a player's entire career, too, which could help with affordability. The headgear would be reconditioned and re-certified every year by Riddell which is standard protocol for all football helmets at every level of play already, as Ide said it would be "atypical" for even a high school program to not recondition its helmets every year so the helmets will conceivably perform just as well after a few seasons as it did new.

Smarter innovation

Precision Fit is just a step in Riddell's plan to bring the football helmet in line with modern technology. Ide said the company has two distinct development paths: one focused on harnessing sensors and computing to capture impact data for future development, another for the more immediately pressing matter of a helmet maker, head protection.

"Riddell invested more than 10 years ago in head impact monitoring and helmet-based sensor technology that can transmit impact data from the field to the sideline," he said. "Weve collected about five million impacts, and we have enough of a database now that you can really see differences in impact profiles. We think were at the point where we can tune helmets to be optimized for playing position, skill level, because players see different types of impact profiles depending on those factors."

Ide said integrated sensor tech and position-specific helmets will be expected in helmets in as little as five years, and individual "impact profiles" tracking their on-field collisions will give players, coaches, and medical staffs better insight into each individual's playing style and how best to protect their heads.

The company has a plan to bring its sensors and head protection together by 2022.

Image: riddell

Riddell is far from the only company working to improve football helmet design its biggest rival, Schutt (which claims 37 percent of the NFL market), released two new models last year, the Vengeance Z10 and the Vengeance Pro, which tout new lightweight builds with high safety ratings. The two companies are currently locked in a legal battle over patent infringement but a new player is primed to enter the scene.

Starting this year, NFL and college players will be allowed to wear headgear made by Vicis, a Seattle-based startup whose Zero1 helmet is designed to yield to contact and "deform" at the point of impact, unlike Schutt and Riddell's designs, which have rigid outer shells and pads to cushion the head after each collision. The Zero1 was the highest-performing helmet in an NFL-sponsored safety test, so it will likely be adopted by players looking for increased protection.

In this field, competition and new innovations should be more than welcome by the helmet makers and everyone else involved in the effort to make the game safer. For now, though, increased levels of protection is all these helmet makers can offer players and teams.

Concussions, which most typically occur in football when a high level impact causes the brain to strike the skull and begins to swell, can't just be prevented by a better fitting helmet. They're an unavoidable reality for the sport as it's currently played, and no helmet can promise a truly concussion-free football experience so bringing new safety technologies onto the field will be integral to football's future.

More From this publisher : HERE

=>
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Article Source Here: These new 3D scan fit helmets could make football safer
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2462
Coke’s new label in Romania is also a music festival wristbandhttp://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/cokes-new-label-in-romania-is-also-a-music-festival-wristband/ Sun, 28 May 2017 17:25:13 +0000 http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/?p=2459

Bottles of Coke could get Romanians into concerts this summer.

The soda giant is printing detachable labels that double as festival wristbands to some of the country's biggest musical events.

Not every bottle is a winner; drinkers have to use a special app to determine whether or not their package is a real ticket.

But the company is hoping that the eight quirky designs it's rolling out will make teens want to wear them regardless.

Among Coke's festival partners is Transylvania's Untold, one of the premiere musical events in Europe.

The ad campaign was supposedly prompted by market research showing that four in 10 Romanian teens hadn't had Coke in the past month.

The soda company now claims the efforts has already reached three quarters of that same group and boosted sales by more than 10 percent in the country.

More From this publisher : HERE

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Read More Here: Coke’s new label in Romania is also a music festival wristband
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Bottles of Coke could get Romanians into concerts this summer.

The soda giant is printing detachable labels that double as festival wristbands to some of the country's biggest musical events.

Not every bottle is a winner; drinkers have to use a special app to determine whether or not their package is a real ticket.

But the company is hoping that the eight quirky designs it's rolling out will make teens want to wear them regardless.

Among Coke's festival partners is Transylvania's Untold, one of the premiere musical events in Europe.

The ad campaign was supposedly prompted by market research showing that four in 10 Romanian teens hadn't had Coke in the past month.

The soda company now claims the efforts has already reached three quarters of that same group and boosted sales by more than 10 percent in the country.

More From this publisher : HERE

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Read More Here: Coke’s new label in Romania is also a music festival wristband
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2459
Don’t look back in anger: Music helps Manchester remember, and forget – BBC Newshttp://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/dont-look-back-in-anger-music-helps-manchester-remember-and-forget-bbc-news/ Sun, 28 May 2017 14:16:28 +0000 http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/?p=2456
Image copyright Goodman/LNP/REX/Shutterstock
Image caption The Courteeners singer Liam Fray started the show with a poem about the attack

Five days after the Manchester attack, 50,000 people turned out for one of the city's biggest concerts of the year. It was a chance for music fans to unite and remember the victims - but also to get lost in music for a while.

There were a few signs that The Courteeners' show at Old Trafford cricket ground on Saturday was not an ordinary gig.

There were the armed police outside the ground, the flags at half mast over the pavilion, the regular proud chants of "Manchester, la la la" from the crowd, the smattering of "I heart MCR" T-shirts and #WeStandTogether stickers.

There were also the home-made signs, like the one held aloft by a girl teetering on the shoulders of a friend who was sitting on the shoulders of someone else. It read "Hate will not tear us apart" - a reference to the song Love Will Tear Us Apart by another Manchester band, Joy Division.

Image copyright Goodman/LNP/REX/Shutterstock
Image caption This was one of a number of home-made signs responding to the past week's events

Music has always brought people together, especially in this city.

This gig was booked months ago. But since the bombing that killed 22 people at an Ariana Grande concert on Monday, and especially with such a big crowd and an all-Manchester line-up, it became about more than just having a good night - it became about unity, defiance and release.

It was the biggest gig of The Courteeners' careers, but the indie band's frontman Liam Fray told BBC News before the show it was "not about us any more".

He said: "It's about everybody else. It's not just even about the fans that come into the gig, but the city as a whole."

So before his band played a note, Fray appeared alone on stage to read a poem written by Ryan Williams in response to the attack, celebrating the "city of tracksuits and bibles and burkas".

It ends with the lines:

So come at us again, and again if you must.

Time after time, we'll rise from the dust.

And you'll never prevail, not against us.

Because this is our Manchester, our Manchester, and the bees still buzz.

The roar that greeted that last line would surely have drowned out any cheer the ground has ever heard in response to any Ashes-winning wicket.

Image caption These signs including "Mancs never scared 2 B proud" referred to the city's bee emblem

As the gig went on, Fray referred to the week's events again. "Never stop doing what you enjoy," he told the crowd between songs.

Later, he said to them: "I just want to say how incredibly proud I was to be Mancunian this week.

"Hearts were broken on Monday. And what I've seen of this city and you lot will stay with me for the rest of my life."

He recalled a woman who sang Oasis's Don't Look Back In Anger after the one-minute's silence in St Ann's Square on Thursday, with the rest of those present gradually joining in.

Inspired by that woman, Fray played the song that has now become an anthem of the city's resilience. Fifty-thousand voices joined him and echoed around the ground.

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Armed police guarded the venue and fans were searched on their way in

The Courteeners were supported by The Charlatans, Blossoms and Cabbage - all guitar bands. Their fans are a bit older than Ariana Grande's, and have probably never willingly listened to one of the US pop diva's songs in their lives.

But Saturday's crowd had lots in common with those at Manchester Arena five days earlier. As well as mostly being from the same city, they know well the thrill of seeing their favourite act live, and the sense of belonging that comes from singing every word at the top of your voice with thousands of other like-minded souls.

And, like everyone in the city, they have felt the shock, pain and incomprehension that spread after Monday's attack.

"After what happened this week, the timing for a Manchester gig couldn't be better really to pull the city together," said one Courteeners fan, Matt O'Connor, 37, from Rossendale, Lancashire, before the show.

Seventeen-year-old Amber Clarke from Droylsden wore a top bearing the city's bee emblem. She said: "I feel more proud, and I feel less scared actually. The city's reaction to what happened has just given people so much courage and so much hope."

Image caption Most fans refused to let the week's events dampen their spirits

Another fan in the queue, Cliff Challenger from Stalybridge, said: "There's more defiance, more than anything - just to show that you can't scare us off.

"Plus we've paid for the tickets," he added with a laugh. "So you can't not turn up, let's be honest. That's the proper northern spirit coming through."

Not everyone took the decision over whether to go to the gig lightly.

Liam Wilks has seen every Courteeners gig in Manchester since 2011 - but sold his ticket for Saturday.

"I just know I wouldn't enjoy it," he said beforehand. "I wouldn't be focusing on the music, I'd be focusing on if I saw anything suspicious or... I wouldn't be listening to the music. I'd be watching everything else."

Others undoubtedly stayed away, but it was hard to tell how many.

There was a huge crowd, though, and those that did attend were determined to enjoy it and let off steam as well as showing solidarity and respect.

The best gigs are the ones where you lose yourself in the music and retreat from reality for a couple of hours. Despite the reminders of the recent events, this was no different.

So while the armed guards kept watch outside and the flags flew at half mast, fans inside sat on their friends' shoulders, put their arms around their neighbours' necks, drank lots, moshed, laughed, took off their T-shirts and whirled them above their heads, and sang at the tops of their voices.

Just like they always have done, and hopefully always will.


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Related Topics

More From this publisher : HERE

=>
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Originally Published Here: Don’t look back in anger: Music helps Manchester remember, and forget – BBC News
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Image copyright Goodman/LNP/REX/Shutterstock
Image caption The Courteeners singer Liam Fray started the show with a poem about the attack

Five days after the Manchester attack, 50,000 people turned out for one of the city's biggest concerts of the year. It was a chance for music fans to unite and remember the victims - but also to get lost in music for a while.

There were a few signs that The Courteeners' show at Old Trafford cricket ground on Saturday was not an ordinary gig.

There were the armed police outside the ground, the flags at half mast over the pavilion, the regular proud chants of "Manchester, la la la" from the crowd, the smattering of "I heart MCR" T-shirts and #WeStandTogether stickers.

There were also the home-made signs, like the one held aloft by a girl teetering on the shoulders of a friend who was sitting on the shoulders of someone else. It read "Hate will not tear us apart" - a reference to the song Love Will Tear Us Apart by another Manchester band, Joy Division.

Image copyright Goodman/LNP/REX/Shutterstock
Image caption This was one of a number of home-made signs responding to the past week's events

Music has always brought people together, especially in this city.

This gig was booked months ago. But since the bombing that killed 22 people at an Ariana Grande concert on Monday, and especially with such a big crowd and an all-Manchester line-up, it became about more than just having a good night - it became about unity, defiance and release.

It was the biggest gig of The Courteeners' careers, but the indie band's frontman Liam Fray told BBC News before the show it was "not about us any more".

He said: "It's about everybody else. It's not just even about the fans that come into the gig, but the city as a whole."

So before his band played a note, Fray appeared alone on stage to read a poem written by Ryan Williams in response to the attack, celebrating the "city of tracksuits and bibles and burkas".

It ends with the lines:

So come at us again, and again if you must.

Time after time, we'll rise from the dust.

And you'll never prevail, not against us.

Because this is our Manchester, our Manchester, and the bees still buzz.

The roar that greeted that last line would surely have drowned out any cheer the ground has ever heard in response to any Ashes-winning wicket.

Image caption These signs including "Mancs never scared 2 B proud" referred to the city's bee emblem

As the gig went on, Fray referred to the week's events again. "Never stop doing what you enjoy," he told the crowd between songs.

Later, he said to them: "I just want to say how incredibly proud I was to be Mancunian this week.

"Hearts were broken on Monday. And what I've seen of this city and you lot will stay with me for the rest of my life."

He recalled a woman who sang Oasis's Don't Look Back In Anger after the one-minute's silence in St Ann's Square on Thursday, with the rest of those present gradually joining in.

Inspired by that woman, Fray played the song that has now become an anthem of the city's resilience. Fifty-thousand voices joined him and echoed around the ground.

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Armed police guarded the venue and fans were searched on their way in

The Courteeners were supported by The Charlatans, Blossoms and Cabbage - all guitar bands. Their fans are a bit older than Ariana Grande's, and have probably never willingly listened to one of the US pop diva's songs in their lives.

But Saturday's crowd had lots in common with those at Manchester Arena five days earlier. As well as mostly being from the same city, they know well the thrill of seeing their favourite act live, and the sense of belonging that comes from singing every word at the top of your voice with thousands of other like-minded souls.

And, like everyone in the city, they have felt the shock, pain and incomprehension that spread after Monday's attack.

"After what happened this week, the timing for a Manchester gig couldn't be better really to pull the city together," said one Courteeners fan, Matt O'Connor, 37, from Rossendale, Lancashire, before the show.

Seventeen-year-old Amber Clarke from Droylsden wore a top bearing the city's bee emblem. She said: "I feel more proud, and I feel less scared actually. The city's reaction to what happened has just given people so much courage and so much hope."

Image caption Most fans refused to let the week's events dampen their spirits

Another fan in the queue, Cliff Challenger from Stalybridge, said: "There's more defiance, more than anything - just to show that you can't scare us off.

"Plus we've paid for the tickets," he added with a laugh. "So you can't not turn up, let's be honest. That's the proper northern spirit coming through."

Not everyone took the decision over whether to go to the gig lightly.

Liam Wilks has seen every Courteeners gig in Manchester since 2011 - but sold his ticket for Saturday.

"I just know I wouldn't enjoy it," he said beforehand. "I wouldn't be focusing on the music, I'd be focusing on if I saw anything suspicious or... I wouldn't be listening to the music. I'd be watching everything else."

Others undoubtedly stayed away, but it was hard to tell how many.

There was a huge crowd, though, and those that did attend were determined to enjoy it and let off steam as well as showing solidarity and respect.

The best gigs are the ones where you lose yourself in the music and retreat from reality for a couple of hours. Despite the reminders of the recent events, this was no different.

So while the armed guards kept watch outside and the flags flew at half mast, fans inside sat on their friends' shoulders, put their arms around their neighbours' necks, drank lots, moshed, laughed, took off their T-shirts and whirled them above their heads, and sang at the tops of their voices.

Just like they always have done, and hopefully always will.


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Related Topics

More From this publisher : HERE

=>
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Originally Published Here: Don’t look back in anger: Music helps Manchester remember, and forget – BBC News
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Castlemorton Common: The rave that changed the law – BBC Newshttp://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/castlemorton-common-the-rave-that-changed-the-law-bbc-news/ Sun, 28 May 2017 11:14:39 +0000 http://sportrelated.advices4all.eu/?p=2453
Image copyright Shutterstock
Image caption Ravers knew they could 'just turn up' to the festivals held by New Age Travellers

On a hot bank holiday weekend 25 years ago, 20,000 people descended on land in the shadow of the Malvern Hills. The word was spread by an answering machine message: "Right, listen up revellers. It's happening now and for the rest of the weekend, so get yourself out of the house and on to Castlemorton Common... Be there, all weekend, hardcore."

To say the event spiralled out of control is an understatement.

What started out as a small free festival for travellers not only went down in history as the biggest illegal rave ever held in the UK, but resulted in a trial costing 4m and the passing of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act.

The resulting publicity also had drastic consequences for the "alternative" lifestyle of the so-called New Age Travellers who started the event and for the underground rave movement who gate-crashed it.

Image copyright Malvern Hills Trust
Image caption Thousands of people heard about the event through word-of-mouth, media coverage and the infamous telephone message

The travelling community had been intent on holding the latest in a series of small events, having successfully held the so-called Avon Free Festival at Inglestone Common in Gloucestershire in the 1980s and early 90s.

In the weeks leading up to that fateful May bank holiday in 1992, they had tried and failed to stage festivals in both counties and in Somerset, where the police had repeatedly moved them on.

Retreating, they considered their options in a lay-by on the A38 in Gloucestershire, where it was decided to take their 10-mile long convoy out of the county, into Worcestershire and on to Castlemorton Common, near Malvern.

Interactive Castlemorton rave: Then and now

Castlemorton Common - May 2017

Castlemorton

Castlemorton Common - May 1992

Castlemorton

Libby Spragg was in one of the first vehicles to arrive at the site on the 22 May.

The 24-year-old joined the New Age Travellers in 1987 and had been to previous events across the West Country, including Inglestone.

She said the festivals were a chance "for networking, finding new work opportunities and just meeting friends that you couldn't really see at any other time", after a winter spent living and working on farms.

"Ingleston Common [had] one small stage, no dance music, and was part of the small free festival scene that had been bubbling along since the 60s."

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionThe answering machine message that started the Castlemorton Common rave

Castlemorton should have continued that theme, she said, a low-key gathering for roughly 400 travellers.

What they hadn't banked on was the thousands of people who had heard about the event through word-of-mouth, media coverage and the infamous telephone message.

Carl Hendrickse, whose band Back to the Planet played at the festival, said a large number of people had been regularly travelling up and down the M25 to raves.

"People were not being given the right to gather," he explained.

"There were no facilities for people to come and dance, gather with like-minded people, and that is why they started happening illegally, because there were no proper facilities for people to have these kind of events."

Image caption New Age Traveller Libby Spragg was interviewed by TV on her way to the site

Carl Loben, editor of DJ magazine, said in a world before mobile phones, the answering machine messages were key to spreading word about the raves.

"There was often just a message left on a party [phone] line that people could call after a certain time in the evening," he said.

"And it would say the rave is at [some location], meet at [this] junction of the motorway, or meet in the service station, and you'd go in convoy."

Image copyright Shutterstock
Image caption People would travel to festivals like Castlemorton in convoy
Image caption Ravers remember it as a positive atmosphere with like-minded people

Mrs Spagg believes the combination of a gloriously sunny bank holiday and the promise of a ready-made party was what drew ravers to Castlemorton.

"You were getting [sound system collectives like] Spiral Tribe and the big [underground] DJs of the time latching onto the idea to take it out doors and the free festival scene was a real "no brain" way to do that," she said.

"They could see what was happening with the travellers and [knew] they could turn up.

"[It wasn't] helped by the media to be honest - if they hadn't said anything it would have just stopped as it was.

"But as soon as you start putting it out on the television that there's this huge party everyone jumps in their car and just turns up."

Image copyright Shutterstock
Image caption The 392-acre Castlemorton Common was made a Site of Special Scientific Interest in 1986
Image copyright Darren Coe
Image caption The music went on until the early hours and started again at midday

And so the underground warehouse rave scene arrived, with its big sound systems in tow.

Mrs Spragg says there was "some resentment" among the travellers who felt their event had been "taken over" and part of the festival was declared a "raver free zone".

But while the travellers felt surrounded, so did those living on the common, such as Mary Weaver.

"On the bank below the hills it was tightly compacted, and as you went down by our [farm] pond there were double-decker buses lined up all along there," she remembered.

"It was very disruptive because no-one could get in or out - not with a vehicle.

"They had some very loud sound systems and they played very loud music, but in actual fact the music didn't worry me that much, because I like music.

"But it did other people, it drove [them] mad. It stopped about five o'clock in the morning and it started up about midday."

Image copyright Shutterstock
Image caption Travellers used festivals as a way to network, find new work opportunities and meet friends

News of the festival spread locally, helped by the volume of the music, which could easily be heard in Malvern 10 miles (16km) away - a fact former resident, Tim Holloway, can attest.

"I was coming back from an all-night party in Malvern and walking back at about five in the morning I could hear this booming beat - I had no idea what it could be," he said.

"Later someone told me there was this massive rave on Castlemorton Common.

"We rode through on motorbikes and I was stunned, it was just enormous. We took it all in, soaked up the atmosphere - it was just an enormous party - a gift when you're 21."

Clare Buchanan, who was on a gap year, heard about the festival when some of those en route stopped at the supermarket in Malvern where she worked.

"They looked like full-on hippies, which is what I wanted to be," she recalled.

"My and a friend went along to investigate what was going on. We were dropped off and there were two policemen at the end of the road across the common.

"There was a very chilled atmosphere."

Image copyright Back To The Planet
Image caption Back To The Planet played at Castlemorton Common in 1992

But by Saturday night, West Mercia Police had arrived and put up a cordon.

Officers were stationed with Ms Weaver and fellow resident Audrey Street who said she "never went out once" the whole week.

She described how the single track road across the common was completely blocked in places by the encampment and the complete absence of toilets had another unwanted effect.

"Every time I went out there were people in the field toileting - every time you looked out there were men with their trousers down," she said.

Image caption Mary Weaver's farm, pictured now, was taken over by festival-goers
Image caption The encampment stretched up the hill from the farm near her house

The ravers drifted off once the weekend was over but the travellers remained at Castlemorton until the Friday, partly to try and clear up, Mrs Spagg claims.

"I think a lot of people were depressed about the mess and the waste, that's why so many [of us] stayed behind and tried to clear up.

"Although people don't think it, the traveller ethos at free festivals was "leave no trace" - you went there, you had a party you cleaned up.

"In fact I was one of the many people who used to take wild flower seeds, and that would be the only thing I left - that sounds like I'm a real hippy but that was the vibe," she said.

But there was no chance revellers would ever again have the opportunity to "leave no trace".

As the festival wound down, police faced angry questions at a public meeting in Castlemorton village about how they had responded.

Image copyright Shutterstock
Image caption The fallout of the festival had an impact on the travelling scene

In a press conference on the Friday after the common had been cleared, then Chief Constable, David Blakey, defended his "softly softly" approach.

"Faced with... the number of people that were there, there was no way I'm going in with riot shields, with public order gear, to move them off," he said at the time.

Officers arrested about 50 people over the course of the festival - mainly for drug offences - and 10 were taken to court for public order offences. The case cost millions and saw all the defendants acquitted, though one other person did plead guilty to the same offence.

The force later admitted they had been "caught off guard" by the sudden arrival of so many people.

Image copyright Malvern Hills Trust
Image caption An exclusion zone was set up banning convoys from the area

Determined not to have history repeat itself, the following year they set up roadblocks across the area, with 300 officers being fed from a special kitchen set up in the village hall.

The Malvern Hills Conservators - the charity set up to look after the hills and commons - obtained an injunction which enforced a five-mile "exclusion zone" for convoys of vehicles around Castlemorton during the bank holiday weekend.

Others called for long-term powers to stop raves and free festivals, including Castlemorton's then-Conservative MP Sir Michael Spicer, who even raised the matter in Parliament.

Then in 1994, the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act was passed, giving police the powers to stop vehicles anywhere within five miles (8km) of a rave and turn them away.

It also included rules targeting gatherings of more than 100 people listening to music at night and even went as far as delving into genres, said Prof Robert Lee from Birmingham Law School.

"One of the most bizarre things is that they tried to define what music was, including wholly or mainly repetitive beats played time and time again," he added.

Image caption Police faced angry questions at a public meeting in Castlemorton village

Ms Spragg, who gave up travelling in 1995, says what happened at Castlemorton had an adverse effect on the community she belonged to.

"The travelling scene did carry on but it was a very different change of lifestyle for people - they moved onto farms instead of living on free sites so much, and people were a lot more scared.

"If it had been a big event, [which] had been staged [and] had cost thousands of pounds it would have been all right.

"But because it was poor people, with no money, doing something they haven't been granted permission for, suddenly it was the crime of the century.

"It did mean the end of the travelling scene in a lot of respects."

Related Topics

More From this publisher : HERE

=>
***********************************************
Learn More Here: Castlemorton Common: The rave that changed the law – BBC News
************************************
=>

]]>
Image copyright Shutterstock
Image caption Ravers knew they could 'just turn up' to the festivals held by New Age Travellers

On a hot bank holiday weekend 25 years ago, 20,000 people descended on land in the shadow of the Malvern Hills. The word was spread by an answering machine message: "Right, listen up revellers. It's happening now and for the rest of the weekend, so get yourself out of the house and on to Castlemorton Common... Be there, all weekend, hardcore."

To say the event spiralled out of control is an understatement.

What started out as a small free festival for travellers not only went down in history as the biggest illegal rave ever held in the UK, but resulted in a trial costing 4m and the passing of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act.

The resulting publicity also had drastic consequences for the "alternative" lifestyle of the so-called New Age Travellers who started the event and for the underground rave movement who gate-crashed it.

Image copyright Malvern Hills Trust
Image caption Thousands of people heard about the event through word-of-mouth, media coverage and the infamous telephone message

The travelling community had been intent on holding the latest in a series of small events, having successfully held the so-called Avon Free Festival at Inglestone Common in Gloucestershire in the 1980s and early 90s.

In the weeks leading up to that fateful May bank holiday in 1992, they had tried and failed to stage festivals in both counties and in Somerset, where the police had repeatedly moved them on.

Retreating, they considered their options in a lay-by on the A38 in Gloucestershire, where it was decided to take their 10-mile long convoy out of the county, into Worcestershire and on to Castlemorton Common, near Malvern.

Interactive Castlemorton rave: Then and now

Castlemorton Common - May 2017

Castlemorton

Castlemorton Common - May 1992

Castlemorton

Libby Spragg was in one of the first vehicles to arrive at the site on the 22 May.

The 24-year-old joined the New Age Travellers in 1987 and had been to previous events across the West Country, including Inglestone.

She said the festivals were a chance "for networking, finding new work opportunities and just meeting friends that you couldn't really see at any other time", after a winter spent living and working on farms.

"Ingleston Common [had] one small stage, no dance music, and was part of the small free festival scene that had been bubbling along since the 60s."

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionThe answering machine message that started the Castlemorton Common rave

Castlemorton should have continued that theme, she said, a low-key gathering for roughly 400 travellers.

What they hadn't banked on was the thousands of people who had heard about the event through word-of-mouth, media coverage and the infamous telephone message.

Carl Hendrickse, whose band Back to the Planet played at the festival, said a large number of people had been regularly travelling up and down the M25 to raves.

"People were not being given the right to gather," he explained.

"There were no facilities for people to come and dance, gather with like-minded people, and that is why they started happening illegally, because there were no proper facilities for people to have these kind of events."

Image caption New Age Traveller Libby Spragg was interviewed by TV on her way to the site

Carl Loben, editor of DJ magazine, said in a world before mobile phones, the answering machine messages were key to spreading word about the raves.

"There was often just a message left on a party [phone] line that people could call after a certain time in the evening," he said.

"And it would say the rave is at [some location], meet at [this] junction of the motorway, or meet in the service station, and you'd go in convoy."

Image copyright Shutterstock
Image caption People would travel to festivals like Castlemorton in convoy
Image caption Ravers remember it as a positive atmosphere with like-minded people

Mrs Spagg believes the combination of a gloriously sunny bank holiday and the promise of a ready-made party was what drew ravers to Castlemorton.

"You were getting [sound system collectives like] Spiral Tribe and the big [underground] DJs of the time latching onto the idea to take it out doors and the free festival scene was a real "no brain" way to do that," she said.

"They could see what was happening with the travellers and [knew] they could turn up.

"[It wasn't] helped by the media to be honest - if they hadn't said anything it would have just stopped as it was.

"But as soon as you start putting it out on the television that there's this huge party everyone jumps in their car and just turns up."

Image copyright Shutterstock
Image caption The 392-acre Castlemorton Common was made a Site of Special Scientific Interest in 1986
Image copyright Darren Coe
Image caption The music went on until the early hours and started again at midday

And so the underground warehouse rave scene arrived, with its big sound systems in tow.

Mrs Spragg says there was "some resentment" among the travellers who felt their event had been "taken over" and part of the festival was declared a "raver free zone".

But while the travellers felt surrounded, so did those living on the common, such as Mary Weaver.

"On the bank below the hills it was tightly compacted, and as you went down by our [farm] pond there were double-decker buses lined up all along there," she remembered.

"It was very disruptive because no-one could get in or out - not with a vehicle.

"They had some very loud sound systems and they played very loud music, but in actual fact the music didn't worry me that much, because I like music.

"But it did other people, it drove [them] mad. It stopped about five o'clock in the morning and it started up about midday."

Image copyright Shutterstock
Image caption Travellers used festivals as a way to network, find new work opportunities and meet friends

News of the festival spread locally, helped by the volume of the music, which could easily be heard in Malvern 10 miles (16km) away - a fact former resident, Tim Holloway, can attest.

"I was coming back from an all-night party in Malvern and walking back at about five in the morning I could hear this booming beat - I had no idea what it could be," he said.

"Later someone told me there was this massive rave on Castlemorton Common.

"We rode through on motorbikes and I was stunned, it was just enormous. We took it all in, soaked up the atmosphere - it was just an enormous party - a gift when you're 21."

Clare Buchanan, who was on a gap year, heard about the festival when some of those en route stopped at the supermarket in Malvern where she worked.

"They looked like full-on hippies, which is what I wanted to be," she recalled.

"My and a friend went along to investigate what was going on. We were dropped off and there were two policemen at the end of the road across the common.

"There was a very chilled atmosphere."

Image copyright Back To The Planet
Image caption Back To The Planet played at Castlemorton Common in 1992

But by Saturday night, West Mercia Police had arrived and put up a cordon.

Officers were stationed with Ms Weaver and fellow resident Audrey Street who said she "never went out once" the whole week.

She described how the single track road across the common was completely blocked in places by the encampment and the complete absence of toilets had another unwanted effect.

"Every time I went out there were people in the field toileting - every time you looked out there were men with their trousers down," she said.

Image caption Mary Weaver's farm, pictured now, was taken over by festival-goers
Image caption The encampment stretched up the hill from the farm near her house

The ravers drifted off once the weekend was over but the travellers remained at Castlemorton until the Friday, partly to try and clear up, Mrs Spagg claims.

"I think a lot of people were depressed about the mess and the waste, that's why so many [of us] stayed behind and tried to clear up.

"Although people don't think it, the traveller ethos at free festivals was "leave no trace" - you went there, you had a party you cleaned up.

"In fact I was one of the many people who used to take wild flower seeds, and that would be the only thing I left - that sounds like I'm a real hippy but that was the vibe," she said.

But there was no chance revellers would ever again have the opportunity to "leave no trace".

As the festival wound down, police faced angry questions at a public meeting in Castlemorton village about how they had responded.

Image copyright Shutterstock
Image caption The fallout of the festival had an impact on the travelling scene

In a press conference on the Friday after the common had been cleared, then Chief Constable, David Blakey, defended his "softly softly" approach.

"Faced with... the number of people that were there, there was no way I'm going in with riot shields, with public order gear, to move them off," he said at the time.

Officers arrested about 50 people over the course of the festival - mainly for drug offences - and 10 were taken to court for public order offences. The case cost millions and saw all the defendants acquitted, though one other person did plead guilty to the same offence.

The force later admitted they had been "caught off guard" by the sudden arrival of so many people.

Image copyright Malvern Hills Trust
Image caption An exclusion zone was set up banning convoys from the area

Determined not to have history repeat itself, the following year they set up roadblocks across the area, with 300 officers being fed from a special kitchen set up in the village hall.

The Malvern Hills Conservators - the charity set up to look after the hills and commons - obtained an injunction which enforced a five-mile "exclusion zone" for convoys of vehicles around Castlemorton during the bank holiday weekend.

Others called for long-term powers to stop raves and free festivals, including Castlemorton's then-Conservative MP Sir Michael Spicer, who even raised the matter in Parliament.

Then in 1994, the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act was passed, giving police the powers to stop vehicles anywhere within five miles (8km) of a rave and turn them away.

It also included rules targeting gatherings of more than 100 people listening to music at night and even went as far as delving into genres, said Prof Robert Lee from Birmingham Law School.

"One of the most bizarre things is that they tried to define what music was, including wholly or mainly repetitive beats played time and time again," he added.

Image caption Police faced angry questions at a public meeting in Castlemorton village

Ms Spragg, who gave up travelling in 1995, says what happened at Castlemorton had an adverse effect on the community she belonged to.

"The travelling scene did carry on but it was a very different change of lifestyle for people - they moved onto farms instead of living on free sites so much, and people were a lot more scared.

"If it had been a big event, [which] had been staged [and] had cost thousands of pounds it would have been all right.

"But because it was poor people, with no money, doing something they haven't been granted permission for, suddenly it was the crime of the century.

"It did mean the end of the travelling scene in a lot of respects."

Related Topics

More From this publisher : HERE

=>
***********************************************
Learn More Here: Castlemorton Common: The rave that changed the law – BBC News
************************************
=>

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